The cost for concrete countertops ranges from $65 to $135 per square foot. This price usually includes the countertop design, materials, construction, and installation. Unlike other options, the cost of a concrete countertop is not in the material, but rather in the artisan's skill and creativity. Custom elements such as inlays, aggregates, or special finishes add considerable cost.

CONCRETE COUNTERTOP COST COMPARISON

The price for concrete falls in the mid-range of countertop options. Typically, concrete is more expensive than tile, synthetic solids or laminate, about the same price as engineered quartz or granite countertops and less expensive than marble.

Laminate $20 - $50
Tile $20 - $70
Synthetic Solid Surfaces (i.e. Corian) $50 - $90
CONCRETE $65 - $135
Granite $70 - $175
Engineered Quartz $80 - $140
Marble $110 - $250

Concrete Countertop Pricing
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Find out how the price of a concrete countertop is determined.

See how concrete countertops compare to traditional countertop materials in other ways.

PRICE RANGES

The price of a concrete countertop varies widely depending on the complexity. Concrete can be a quite affordable option, especially left its natural color with a basic layout. However, many people find themselves drawn to concrete because of the customization factor and decide that getting exactly what they want is worth the investment.

Basic | $65-$100 per square foot

Countertops at the lower end of the price range include:

  • Basic design with straight edges
  • Standard knockouts for sinks and faucets
  • Non-custom color and finish options

Mid-Range | $100-$135 per square foot

Countertops in the mid-range price include:

  • The addition of integral or seeded aggregates
  • Custom or decorative shapes or edge details
  • Increased color and finish options

High End | $135+ per square foot

A high-end countertop is further customized with:

  • Unique thickness or shape
  • Custom or multi-color options
  • Creative casting techniques
  • Specialized aggregate design
  • Custom edge details
  • Inlays, drainboards or trivets

These items add to the custom concrete countertop cost:

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

Shipping:

Countertop contractors, in almost all cases, install their own product in their market area, so there would be no shipping expense. Shipping method and carrier, for those firms that do ship, varies by contractor. Discuss this with your contractor.

Installation:

Although normally included in the price, countertop installation can be quoted separately and averages $40 - $50 per hour, per person. Confirm what is included in the price from your contractor.

Removal and disposal:

If you are replacing an existing countertop, this may not be included in the price from your contractor. Again, confirm what is included.

Plumbing and wiring:

If your countertop renovation involves a change in plumbing or appliances, extra costs may be incurred to relocate pipes or rewire new appliances.

TWO ECONOMICAL APPROACHES TO CONCRETE COUNTERTOPS

  1. An economical way to green up your countertops while making them more aesthetically appealing and distinctive is to use recycled or salvaged materials as decorative accents, such as pieces of broken pottery or dinnerware and recycled colored glass. When shopping around for concrete countertops, ask local fabricators what goes into their mix designs. Often you can benefit the environment and save money by doing business with a contractor who uses recycled waste materials or materials harvested or produced near your home, such as aggregate from a local river or quarry and cement produced in a regional plant. See Going Green with Countertops

  2. Think long-term value: With concrete countertops, when you combine a timeless design with the inherent durability of concrete, your countertops will serve you well for decades-both functionally and aesthetically-and thus are unlikely to need replacement. This not only conserves materials and eliminates waste, it saves you the expense and hassle of ripping out worn, outdated countertops.

DIY VS. HIRING A PRO

Although it may sound tempting to pour your own concrete countertops to save money, it is a much more complex job than a typical DIY project. Precast counters are extremely heavy and difficult to maneuver, and pouring in place requires knowledge of the proper mix, curing and finishing processes, as well as specialized tools and equipment. This is one project that is best left to the pros. Find a countertop contractor near you.

Last updated: June 25, 2018